Although there are technically no parks in Montmartre, there are a few of what the city calls ‘green spaces’. Here are the best of them.

Square Marcel Bleustein Blanchet

Square Marcel Bleustein Blanchet

Situated on the corners of rue de la Bonne and rue de Chavalier de la Barre; the Square Marcel Bleustein Blanchet is nestled just behind the famous Sacré-Coeur. Previously the site of an 18th century mill and later a tavern, the park has incredible views of Montmartre. Previously named parc de la Turlure, after the former mill, it was renamed in 2004 after French advertising magnate Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet.

Occupying a space of just over 4700 m², the picturesque square contains a small amphitheatre and is a perfect summer picnic spot. The park also houses rows of stone benches, covered by wisteria and Virginia vines – a welcome refuge from the summer sun.

Square Louise-Michel

Square Louise-Michel

Montmartre’s most prominent green space, the Square Louise-Michel is the park right in front of the Sacré-Coeur basilica. The first square was opened in 1872, but was beset by landslides. The project to finally rebuild the square would take decades with 3 architects attempting the project. The square would finally reopen, after the First World War, in 1927. Under the name Square Willette, after the famed artist, who had lived in Montmartre. In 2004, the park’s name was changed to Square Louise-Michel after a campaign to remove Willete’s name owing to his anti-Semitism.

A a summertime tanning destination for tourists and locals alike, its multiple lawns are overlooked by terraces with unbeatable views of the city of lights.

Jardin Sauvage Saint Vincent

Jardin Sauvage Saint Vincent

The ‘savage garden’ of Saint Vincent was once a public square, before it was being abandoned for 20 years. Neighbour to the only operating vineyard in Paris, the garden was left it its own devices until 1985. Under the watch of the city of Paris, the wild garden was allowed to evolve as it would naturally. New animal and planet species were introduced; today the garden contains many wild plants that were once used for medicinal remedies. The garden is only available to visit through guided tours.

The park is easy to reach, just take metro line 12 to Lamarck-Caulincourt, or take the number 40 bus.

Square Léon Serpollet

Square Léon Serpollet


The Square Léon Sepollet maybe Montmartre’s least known park. Certainly the areas least visited by tourist park, the 16,000m park is in the more residential part of the old village. With playgrounds, basketball courts, football cages and quiet terraces, it is the best park for families and those wishing to play sports.

You can reach the park by either the stations Lamarck – Caulaincourt or Jules Joffrin on the metro line 12.